fbpx

Tag Archives: Roaring Fork

Bud Ogle Place in Winter

Bud Ogle Place in Winter

Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only

After a snowfall followed by frigid temperatures, I was out at the Ogle Place along the Roaring Fork in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On this morning I was trying to keep feeling in my fingers with the temperature around 9 degrees!

Photographing scenes like the ones above and below presents a challenge of extreme lighting conditions. The sun had begun to light up the snow, producing very bright highlights, but the shadow areas on the porch were still very dark. The range of light is simply too much for the camera to record.  So, a couple of strategies were used for these pictures.  First, about 4 exposures were taken–some over exposed and some underexposed–and blended together. Second, I converted the image to black and white, and blended that in with the color version.  Since these images have little color anyway, this technique serves to add some texture to the snow, keeping it from going to solid white.

The iconic Ogle Cabin nearly burned during the fires of November 2016. The fire came right up to the back porch, which would be to the left in the photo below.

If you’re in Gatlinburg, please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery on glades Road.

Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Favorite Trails: Grotto Falls

Favorite Trails: Grotto Falls

Trail to Grotto Falls © William Britten use with permission only
Trail to Grotto Falls © William Britten use with permission only

The route to Grotto Falls is one of the sweetest Smoky Mountains waterfalls hikes.  Not much more than a mile in length, this hike has a gem at the end, with many opportunities for photos.  As the sign above indicates, it’s a part of the Trillium Gap Trail which goes on up to Mt. LeConte.  The hike starts from a parking area along the Roaring Fork Motor Trail (stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg).

Behind the waterfall
Behind the waterfall © William Britten use with permission only

I hiked up to the waterfall in late November, just before the Roaring Fork Motor loop closed for the winter. Grotto Falls is especially nifty because the trail goes behind the falls, as seen in the photos above and below. And an added bonus, the llama pack train that carries supplies to LeConte Lodge can be seen on the trail every Monday, Wednesday and Friday … leaving at dawn and returning sometime between 3:00 and 5:00.

Llamas on the trail
Llamas on the trail © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me out on the Arts and Crafts Loop along Glades Road to see the complete display of photos of Smoky Mountains scenes at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Mysterious Mountain Memories

Mysterious Mountain Memories

Smoky Mountains Midnight Dawn
Smoky Mountains Midnight Dawn © William Britten use with permission only

In the middle of a hot summer, I can get restless, and feeling a bit confined within the boundaries of “normal” images. I start to think “outside the camera.”  For example, a few weeks ago I wrote a post about camera movement during long exposures to create photographic Impressionism.

Today’s Smoky Mountains photos have a bit of the surreal, a dash of a midnight memory or dream with a dollop of daylight’s bright colors. It’s like filling in the blanks of your memory along the border between the dream and the wakeful daytime. Of course the Light and the Dark are the two realms we know, and to mix them together can stir up feelings.

What do the images suggest to you or make you feel?

Sunlight chases the night
Sunlight chases the night © William Britten use with permission only

The photos on this page were taken in the area of the Smoky Mountains known as the Roaring Fork. This is a beautiful area, and somewhat mysterious under any conditions, especially with those green boulders strewn down the stream bed. These pictures are more experiments with long exposures. It’s early in the morning along the dark creeks, and the day is not nearly as bright as the photos make it seem.  The exposure times are in the area of 30 seconds, which adds another dash of the surreal with the extreme flow of the whitewater.

When your dreams finally clear, please consider a stop at the William Britten Gallery along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Rd. in Gatlinburg.  My complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos might tempt you with a special memory to take home with you.

Roaring Fork Memories
Roaring Fork Memories © William Britten use with permission only
Along the Roaring Fork: Bud Ogle Farm

Along the Roaring Fork: Bud Ogle Farm

Smoky Mountains Landmark
Smoky Mountains Landmark © William Britten use with permission only

The Ogle family goes way back in the Gatlinburg area. In fact, Noah Ogle’s great-grandparents, William  (1756–1803) and his wife Martha Huskey (1756–1826), made a life here in the early 1800s. Noah (aka Bud) and Cindy Ogle settled on this 400 acre homestead in 1879 and lived here until Noah’s death in 1913.

Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

The Smoky Mountains forest has reclaimed most of the cleared land now, so it’s hard to imagine a family making a subsistence living here. All that is left now is the log cabin and barn. The cabin is “saddle-bag” style, with two cabins joined by a common chimney. The barn is the last remaining four-pen barn in the Smokies, consisting of four 11-square-foot livestock pens, covered by a split-shingled roof.

Just behind the cabin is a nature trail that meanders through a hemlock forest beside LeConte Creek to an old tub mill with wooden flume.

Bud Ogle Barn © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Barn © William Britten use with permission only

To visit the Ogle Farm, turn at stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg and go up the hill, entering the Smoky Mountain National Park via the Cherokee Orchard Road entrance. The old farmstead is an attractive location for photos anytime of year. I love to come up here after a snowfall, as compositions with the old log cabin and barnwood in a snowy setting make for especially attractive photos.

The Ogle cabin is one of my Featured Photos. Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel Time in the Smokies

Mountain Laurel Time in the Smokies

Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains  © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel bloom in the Smoky Mountains  © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel bloom in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only

It’s that beautiful time of year again when the Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia) bloom along the trails and in the woods of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The Mountain Laurel are similar to, and often mistaken for, Rhododendron. In the Smokies the Laurel bloom primarily during May, while the Rhododendron come along in June and July.

One of the Featured Photographs at the William Britten Gallery is Path to Serenity, which shows a hillside of Mountain Laurel blooming along the trail to Spruce Flat Falls.

Mountain Laurel bloom in the Smoky Mountains  © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel bloom in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only

One of the best displays of Mountain Laurel can be found along the Roaring Fork Motor Trail. At the top of the hill there is a parking area to the left. In early to mid-May you can see the thickets of laurel from your car, but to get the full effect, get out and walk in among all the blooms.

I was in that spot photographing, deep in my private reverie with my eyes in the camera viewfinder. Suddenly I heard some snorting and clomping, and looked up to see that a doe had joined me in the laurel thicket. She was unafraid, and stayed close by for 30 minutes or so, even when I moved my tripod from spot to spot.

Deer in  the Mountain Laurel © William Britten use with permission only
Deer in the Mountain Laurel © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only
Mountain Laurel in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only

Smoky Mountain Llamas

Smoky Mountain Llamas

Smoky Mountain Llamas © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mountain Llamas © William Britten use with permission only

A packtrain of llamas is used to carry bed linens and supplies to Mt. LeConte Lodge. The llamas are easier on the heavily used Great Smoky Mountains National Park trails than horses.

In the picture below the llamas are passing behind Grotto Falls. Normally, the packtrain makes the trip from the Grotto Falls Parking area on the Roaring Fork Motor Trail on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Departure is often just around daybreak, and return between 3:00 and 5:00 in the afternoon.

Llamas behind Grotto Falls © William Britten use with permission only
Llamas behind Grotto Falls © William Britten use with permission only

Green Rocks of the Roaring Fork

Green Rocks of the Roaring Fork

Moss-covered rock of the Roaring Fork

Something green for St. Patrick’s Day. Nothing greener in the Great Smoky Mountains than the moss-covered rocks of the Roaring Fork.  Conditions on the north face of Mt. LeConte create an extremely wet environment and a rich lushness of plant life. There may be no better example than the amazing green rocks and boulders along the Roaring Fork creek, with moss so thick  that it becomes a world unto itself.

Moss-covered rock of the Roaring Fork

Detail of moss on a boulder

The Roaring Fork makes it’s steep run from the summit of Mt. LeConte to the condos of Gatlinburg through a jumble of green-carpeted boulders. See the Featured Photo: Place of 1000 Drips for another example of how constant moisture gives the moss an exceptional foothold along the Roaring Fork.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Roaring Fork creek in the Smoky Mountains

Detail of moss and flowing water

The Roaring Fork in Black and White

The Roaring Fork in Black and White

Sunrise on the Roaring Fork
Sunrise on the Roaring Fork © William Britten use with permission only

Lately I’ve become hooked on black and white conversions. A couple of weeks ago I posted some black and white Smoky Mountains photos from Cades Cove. Today’s offerings are from along the Roaring Fork.

In the digital era the camera’s sensor records everything in color. Unlike the monochromatic film of yore, you must start with a color image and then do a conversion. But the basics of black and white photography have not changed. Not every scene lends itself to a monochrome presentation. All you have to work with are shades of gray and dark and light. It’s all about contrasts in the areas of light. I think that photos of creeks are good candidates, especially the boulder-strewn Roaring Fork. The natural colors here are mostly whites of the water and grays of the rocks, so you have a lot of neutral shades to work with. Add some dramatic lighting, and you might just have a great black and white photo. The photos on this page were converted using Lightroom, including the addition of a sepia tone that gives each image a warm coloring.

Recently I’ve added some black and white panoramas to my gallery of Smoky Mountains photos. These, and all of my Smokies landscapes are on display at the William Britten Gallery along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Rd. in Gatlinburg.

Smoky Mountains photos: Roaring Fork Morning
Smoky Mountains photos: Roaring Fork Morning © William Britten use with permission only
Along the Roaring Fork: Jim Bales Place

Along the Roaring Fork: Jim Bales Place

Jim Bales Homestead © William Britten use with permission only
Jim Bales Homestead © William Britten use with permission only

The Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail is a narrow, one-way loop and a wonderful opportunity for Smoky Mountains photos. Start from stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg, proceed up the hill and enter the Smokies at the Cherokee Orchard entrance. The six-mile route will take you past several cabins of the early settlers of the area. Jim Bales place is one of several early homesteads that are preserved in the Park.

Who was Jim Bales? James Wesley Bales was born in 1869.  Jim and his older brother, Ephraim, spent most of their lives from the 1860s to the 1930s on the Roaring Fork. Jim married Emma Ogle, a young woman from a neighboring homestead.

The cabin pictured above was actually the Alex Cole cabin moved by the Park Service from the Sugarlands area of the Smokies. But the corncrib and barn, seen below, are what remains of Jim Bales’ life on the Roaring Fork.

The view from Jim's Place © William Britten use with permission only
The view from Jim's Place © William Britten use with permission only

The Roaring Fork cuts down right next the the Bales homestead and provides some fine angles for photos — especially when the dogwoods and rhododendron bloom.

Smoky Mountains photos along the Roaring Fork
Smoky Mountains photos along the Roaring Fork © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in for a visit to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. I’m located along the historic Arts and Crafts Loop along Glades Rd.  And if you are a facebook follower, please consider following my facebook page for daily updates and more Smoky Mountains photos.

Featured Photo: Roaring Fork Sunrise

Featured Photo: Roaring Fork Sunrise

Smoky Mountains Photos: Roaring Fork Sunrise
Smoky Mountains Photos: Roaring Fork Sunrise © William Britten use with permission only

Roaring Fork Sunrise is a featured photo at the William Britten Gallery. It is offered in all sizes up to 20×30. Details of sizes and prices can be found on the How to Buy page. You can also purchase framed or unframed versions of this image from my online store

This image is one of my Smoky Mountains photos from a series that was meant to be somewhat moody and mysterious. Several photos from the series were featured in a blog post titled “Mysterious Mountain Memories.”   Roaring Fork Sunrise was first introduced into the Gatlinburg Gallery as a greeting card, and it has generated enough attention to earn a spot on the wall as a framed piece.

The picture has a dash of the surreal … a sense of daylight chasing the dark along one of the most iconic streams in the Smokies. There’s a midnight memory mixed with daylight’s bright colors, and the mixture of the two realms creates a feeling of mystery. It’s very early morning along the dark creek, and a very long exposure time lets the flowing water contribute to the mood.

If you are traveling to the Smokies, please stop in and say hello at the William Britten Gallery along the Historic Arts and Crafts Loop on Glades Rd. in Gatlinburg. I’m located in the Morning Mist Village shopping area, and my complete selection of Smoky Mountains photos, as well as mugs, notecards and magnets are all on display most days throughout the year. Also, consider following me on facebook by clicking the Like button to the right.

Featured Photo: Place of 1000 Drips

Featured Photo: Place of 1000 Drips

Waterfall in the Great Smoky Mountains
Place of 1000 Drips © William Britten - use with permission only

Place of 1000 Drips is one of my oldest and most enduring Smoky Mountains photos. This is a popular roadside waterfall along the Roaring Fork Motor Trail. Turn at stoplight #8 in Gatlinburg, bearing to the right at the top of the hill, you will enter the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and begin a 6-mile one-way journey on a winding, narrow road through a carefree and timeless canopy of Smoky Mountains paradise. Towards the end of your journey, keep an eye out to the left for this waterfall.  Certain times of the year the flow of water is reduced to literally a group of drips, but in spring especially it can be quite impressive.

This photograph was taken in April, and if you look closely there is a White Trillium on the bank to the left. Balancing my tripod and myself on the slippery rocks, the picture was captured with a wide-angle lens.

Place of 1000 Drips is offered in all sizes up to 20×30. Details of sizes and pricing can be found on the How to Buy page. You can also purchase framed or unframed versions of this image from my online store

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. I’m located in the Morning Mist shopping area along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Rd.

Featured Photo: Noah “Bud” Ogle Cabin

Autumn at the Ogle Cabin

Noah “Bud” Ogle was a Smoky Mountain farmer who lived from 1863 to 1913. The cabin was built in the 1880’s and consists of two cabins sharing a single chimney, known as a “saddlebag” style. The Ogle farm is the first stop on the Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail.   From stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg, head up to the top of the hill and bear left onto Cherokee Orchard Rd, entering the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Ogle place will be just up the road on the right and before the road enters it’s one-way loop for the Motor Nature Trail. There is also a very nice short hike available along the Ogle Nature Trail, which begins just off the back porch!

The three Smoky Mountains photos on this page show the cabin in two seasons. The morning in October in the photo above when I set up my tripod between the cabin and barn, the autumn leaves were at the height of their color, and an early rain shower put a sparkle on the whole scene. The shots below are taken from almost the same location after a winter snow. In these images the browns and whites of the winter scene blend perfectly with the weathered logs of Bud’s cabin.

All of the Bud Ogle Cabin images are available in sizes up to 16×24, in both matted prints and framed. Details of sizes and pricing can be found on the How to Buy page.

Smoky Mountains photos in Winter
Smoky Mountains photos in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle place in Winter
Bud Ogle place in Winter © William Britten use with permission only

When you visit the Smokies, please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos at the William Britten Gallery along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Rd. in Gatlinburg, TN.

Walking the Ogle Nature Trail

Walking the Ogle Nature Trail

Bud Ogle Cabin
Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

This past week I took advantage of a lovely spring morning to walk to Bud Ogle Nature Trail before my day in the Gallery began.  The Bud Ogle Farm is a popular tourist stop at the start of the Roaring Fork Motor Trail, one of the best Smoky Mountains drives.  Most people explore Bud’s cabin and barn and get back in the car. But there is a great little nature trail that starts just off the back porch of the cabin! It’s a wonderful meander around a fairly level loop, crossing LeConte Creek several times.

On this morning the early light softened the dogwoods that were blooming around the Ogle place.

Ogle Tub Mill
Ogle Tub Mill © William Britten use with permission only

Not too far down the trail is the old Tub Mill. The sluice is still there, but not catching any water these days. This mill is one of 13 that worked along LeConte Creek at one time or another.

Today the most notable feature at the mill was the incredible stands of Foamflower in perfect bloom. It’s unusual to see so many of these wildflowers grouped together.

Foamflower panorama
Foamflower panorama © William Britten use with permission only

On down the nature trail there were equally impressive stands of Dwarf Crested Iris. See the dewdrops perched on the Iris leaves? Each one of those drops was reflecting the entire field of wildflowers! I’m going to head back here real soon with a long lens that can magnify those dewdrops!

Crested Dwarf Iris
Crested Dwarf Iris © William Britten use with permission only

Finally, one more find.  Just off the trail is a big jumble of boulders. Looking over at them, it appeared that they were covered with moss. But when I detoured over for a close look, these massive boulders were in fact hosting huge communities of Wild Stonecrop!  Wow!

If you’re in the Gatlinburg area, I’d be delighted if you’d stop in at the William Britten Gallery on Glades Rd in the Arts and Crafts Loop. My collection of Smoky Mountains photos just might have that Smokies memory you’ve been looking for!

Wild Stonecrop
Wild Stonecrop © William Britten use with permission only
Roaring Fork Motor Trail Opens for the Season Today!

Roaring Fork Motor Trail Opens for the Season Today!

Roaring Fork Motor Trail
Roaring Fork Motor Trail © William Britten use with permission only

One of my favorite places in the Smoky Mountains opens today after the annual winter closure.  The Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail is a goldmine for pictures. Pioneer homesteads, amazing moss-covered boulders, waterfalls, and trails. On a typical year, I will go around the Roaring Fork a dozen or fifteen times, watching the seasons change along this familiar route. One of my most popular waterfall pictures, Place of 1000 Drips, can be found right beside the road near the end of the 5 mile motor trail.

One of the best trails in the Smoky Mountains is also along the one-way loop. I last hiked the trail to Grotto Falls in late November, just before the Roaring Fork was closed for the winter. If you’re lucky, you might take a picture of the famous Smoky Mountains llamas ferrying supplies up to LeConte Lodge.

The Roaring Fork also features one of the best displays of Mountain Laurel to be found in the Smoky Mountains. It’s at the top of a hill, beside one of the pull-offs to the right. The large and thick grove of laurel bushes is most amazing if you get out and walk inside it. The laurel usually bloom in the second week of May.  A few weeks before this, you will see lots of Trillium and other wildflowers. And don’t forget the dogwood bloom in mid-April!

At the end of the ride, you’ll exit onto Rt. 321. Take a right turn, and head out to Glades Rd. Turn left on Glades, go a mile or so, and look for the Morning Mist Village shops. If you got this far, please stop in at the William Britten Gallery to see my complete display of pictures from the Smokies. And If you are a Facebook user, you can get my daily Smoky Mountains news and photos by becoming a fan of the William Britten Photography Facebook Page.

Roaring Fork in the Smoky Mountains
Roaring Fork © William Britten use with permission only
Along the Roaring Fork: New Flume for the Mill

Along the Roaring Fork: New Flume for the Mill

New Flume for Reagan's Mill © William Britten use with permission only
New Flume for Reagan's Mill © William Britten use with permission only

In addition to a newly paved loop road for the Roaring Fork in 2010, the Reagan Mill got a brand new flume to carry the water to where the mill once was.  So, although it is pretty and adds to the charm along the Roaring Fork, it is really just a “flume to nowhere” because it only carries the water along for a while before dumping it back in the creek.

What then is the purpose of this seemingly pointless flume? Well, here at breakfast on this beautiful Friday morning I asked Sarah that question. Her reply was that the flume serves as a reminder for the simple, sustainable, harmless technologies that can provide energy for at least this small corner of the world.

New Flume for Reagan's Mill © William Britten use with permission only
New Flume for Reagan's Mill © William Britten use with permission only

As always, when you visit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, please consider visiting me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Along the Roaring Fork: Ely’s Mill

Along the Roaring Fork: Ely’s Mill

Ely's Mill © William Britten use with permission only
Ely’s Mill © William Britten use with permission only

When you come down the hill at the end of the Roaring Fork Motor Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, stop in at Ely’s Mill. It’s a neat little gift shop that dates from the 1920s with local crafts, and honey taken from the hives that stand in the field outside. You can also get to Ely’s Mill by driving up Roaring Fork Road from Rt. 321 out of downtown Gatlinburg.

Smoky Mountain Honey © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mountain Honey © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Ely's Mill Relaxation Station © William Britten use with permission only
Ely’s Mill Relaxation Station © William Britten use with permission only

great smoky mountains photos

Along the Roaring Fork: Ephraim Bales Homestead

Along the Roaring Fork: Ephraim Bales Homestead

Ephraim Bales Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Ephraim Bales Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

Ephraim and Minerva Bales subsisted on 70 rock-infested acres along the Roaring Fork in the early 1900s. Walking around this homestead, it’s hard to escape the sense of overwhelming difficulty that surely characterized the life here. Compared to some of the home places in Cades Cove, or Cataloochee Valley, or even right down the road at the Reagan Place, this looks like a tough choice. The only thing in abundance is rocks … and natural beauty.

Ephraim was the brother of Jim Bales, who also lived along the Roaring Fork. Ephraim and “Nervie” raised 9 children in the little “dog-trot” cabin pictured above.

Ephraim Bales Corncrib © William Britten use with permission only
Ephraim Bales Corncrib © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Along the Roaring Fork: Alfred Reagan Place

Along the Roaring Fork: Alfred Reagan Place

Alfred Reagan Place © William Britten use with permission only
Alfred Reagan Place © William Britten use with permission only

Alfred Reagan lived along the Roaring Fork in the Smoky Mountains in the late 1800s and early 1900s. His home is different than the other settlers cabins in this area in that it is constructed with sawn boards and painted. Supposedly Reagan chose the colors from a limited offering in the Sears catalog.

Reagan was an industrious soul who built a grist mill and store to serve the Roaring Fork community. The mill, pictured below, still stands near his home.

Reagan Mill © William Britten use with permission only
Reagan Mill © William Britten use with permission only

The back room at the Reagan Place features a turquoise painted door that makes this room seem so mysterious to me. I posed my stepson Dylan here one day to add to the mystery of the Reagan Place.

Blue Door Mystery © William Britten use with permission only
Blue Door Mystery © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN

Roaring Fork in the Fog

Roaring Fork in the Fog

Roaring Fork in the Fog © William Britten use with permission only
Roaring Fork in the Fog © William Britten use with permission only

A few days ago we had a thick fog in the morning. I headed out just before daylight to beat the traffic into the Roaring Fork Motor Trail. The fog was still thick when I started around the loop.  But the leaf-lookers were still in bed, so there was no traffic!  I stopped the car and took the picture above with the headlights illuminating the scene.

The image below was taken on the same morning after the fog lifted just a little and the light brightened. This is one of my favorite stops along the Roaring Fork loop.  It’s a stand of poplars that have taken over what was no doubt once a homesteader’s farm field.

Smoky Mountain Trees in Fog © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mountain Trees in Fog © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Leaves in fog © William Britten use with permission only
Leaves in fog © William Britten use with permission only
The Heart of Autumn

The Heart of Autumn

Smoky Mountains Autumn Woods © William Britten use with permission only
Autumn Woods © William Britten use with permission only

This picture was taken along the Newfound Gap Road in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Just stopped the car along the roadside and took this random, typical shot of the woods held in the embrace of autumn. This time of year  you can drive around the Smokies and find pockets of peak leaf color, pockets of green leaves, and pockets where the leaves are nearly gone. Just a matter of elevation and local conditions, I guess.

The image below was along the Roaring Fork, of a stand of poplar trees growing straight to the sky.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Tree Tops in the Smoky Mountains © William Britten use with permission only
Tree Tops © William Britten use with permission only

Signup for our occasional newsletter

Enter your details below and we'll keep you updated via email.

Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.