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Tag Archives: log cabin

Cades Cove: the Tipton Place

Cades Cove: the Tipton Place

Tipton Place © William Britten use with permission only
Tipton Place © William Britten use with permission only

William “Fighting Billy” Tipton was Revolutionary War veteran and the first of the Tipton clan to acquire land in the Smoky Mountains. This was in the 1820s under Tennessee’s Land Grant program.

Colonel Hamp Tipton, a veteran of the Civil War, built the two story cabin above in the early 1870s. Miss Lucy and Miss Lizzy were Hamp’s daughters and worked as schoolteachers in the Cove.

The Tipton Place is one of the best examples of the settlers homesteads along the Cades Cove loop road in the Smokies. There’s a stand of old-fashioned bee gums in the back yard, and across the road is a double-pen corn crib and a fine example of a cantilever barn.

Tipton Place © William Britten use with permission only
Tipton Place © William Britten use with permission only
Bee gums © William Britten use with permission only
Bee gums © William Britten use with permission only

The barn pictured below is actually a replica of the original.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mtns Photos at the William Britten Gallery along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Road in Gatlinburg, TN.

Cantilever barn © William Britten use with permission only
Cantilever barn © William Britten use with permission only
Bear Essentials

Bear Essentials

Log cabin lighting © William Britten use with permission only

I take a lot of photographs log cabins for resort rental companies. And I’ve seen every cute little thing related to bears in these cabins. Many of them are a tacky dis on the proud and mighty black bear. But I like the one pictured above.  The cheerful bear holding out the acorn lamp to guide the way into the cabin at night. Not bad.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

best sellers – smoky mountains photos

Miles Away on Monday: Clouds Floating By

Miles Away on Monday: Clouds Floating By

Rockers with a View © William Britten use with permission only

It’s  a blue-sky morning, clouds floating by. The Smoky Mountains are shimmering in the distance. Two cheerful rockers wait for you on the deck. Take a few moments, sit down, take it all in.

It’s a good day for a hike or a good day to wander the shops on Glades Rd. Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN

great smoky mountains prints

Along the Roaring Fork: Bud Ogle Farm

Along the Roaring Fork: Bud Ogle Farm

Smoky Mountains Landmark
Smoky Mountains Landmark © William Britten use with permission only

The Ogle family goes way back in the Gatlinburg area. In fact, Noah Ogle’s great-grandparents, William  (1756–1803) and his wife Martha Huskey (1756–1826), made a life here in the early 1800s. Noah (aka Bud) and Cindy Ogle settled on this 400 acre homestead in 1879 and lived here until Noah’s death in 1913.

Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

The Smoky Mountains forest has reclaimed most of the cleared land now, so it’s hard to imagine a family making a subsistence living here. All that is left now is the log cabin and barn. The cabin is “saddle-bag” style, with two cabins joined by a common chimney. The barn is the last remaining four-pen barn in the Smokies, consisting of four 11-square-foot livestock pens, covered by a split-shingled roof.

Just behind the cabin is a nature trail that meanders through a hemlock forest beside LeConte Creek to an old tub mill with wooden flume.

Bud Ogle Barn © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Barn © William Britten use with permission only

To visit the Ogle Farm, turn at stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg and go up the hill, entering the Smoky Mountain National Park via the Cherokee Orchard Road entrance. The old farmstead is an attractive location for photos anytime of year. I love to come up here after a snowfall, as compositions with the old log cabin and barnwood in a snowy setting make for especially attractive photos.

The Ogle cabin is one of my Featured Photos. Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Night Work

Night Work

Resort log cabin at daybreak
© William Britten - use with permission only

One of the ways that I survive here in the paradise of Gatlinburg and the Great Smoky Mountains is by taking photographs of the many resort rental properties in the area.  I love to get up before daybreak, get a log cabin all lit up and wait for those rosy fingers of dawn to just begin to appear.  For a short 10 minutes or so the lighting is perfect for a dramatic showing of the cabin.

Dawn comes to the log cabin resort
© William Britten - use with permission only

I have to confess that I also love the Thomas Kincade effect that is possible with a modern log cabin in a glorious Smoky Mountain setting.

Sunrise behind a Smoky Mountains resort cabin
© William Britten - use with permission only

If you would like to see more, there is a larger gallery of cabin images.  But for now on this page, the sun has come up and the mountains are calling their song of being miles away from any cares and worries …

Deck chairs offer a log cabin view of the Smoky Mountains
© William Britten - use with permission only

Deck chairs offer relaxation and a view of the Smoky Mountains
© William Britten - use with permission only

Cabins line up for a Smoky Mountain View
© William Britten - use with permission only

Cabin decor
© William Britten - use with permission only

Favorite Trails: Porters Creek

Favorite Trails: Porters Creek

Porters Creek Trail © William Britten use with permission only
Porters Creek trailhead © William Britten use with permission only

Porters Creek Trail is a delightful meander in the Greenbrier section of the Smoky Mountains. Head east out of Gatlinburg on Route 321, then after about 6 miles, the Greenbrier entrance will be on the right. Eventually the road will turn to gravel and you’ll pass the bridge to the Ramsay Cascades Trail. Continue straight ahead until the road finally dead-ends at the trailhead parking lot. The trail follows Porters Creek for most of the way, and as you can see from the sign it is one of the many trails leading to the summit of Mt. LeConte.

rters Creek in the Smoky Mountains
Porters Creek
Smoky Mountain footbridge
Porters Creek Trail footbridge

The first mile of the trail is a well maintained jeep road with an easy walking grade. Along the way are many opportunities to slow you down and take photos. Watch to the right for many signs of pioneer homesteads. There are rock walls, chimneys, house foundations, and even a primitive cemetery.
These echoes of early settler life in the Smoky Mountains testify to the harsh realities of scraping a life out of rugged and isolated terrain.

Rock wall in the Smoky Mountains
Rock wall remnant from pioneer days
Stone steps
Rock steps from pioneer homestead
Smoky Mountain cemetery
Smoky Mountain cemetery

In April the Porters Creek Trail becomes one of the the best wildflower hikes in the Smokies.

White Trillium © William Britten use with permission only
White Trillium © William Britten use with permission only

For a nice two-mile round-trip hike, continue on up the trail and bear to the right when the jeep road enters a turnaround. At this point you can take a short side-trail over to visit a small group of log buildings, including the John Messer barn, which was built around 1875, and the Smoky Mountain Hiking Club cabin, which was constructed from 1934-36.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of photos of the Smoky Mountains at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. If you are a Facebook user, you can get my daily Smoky Mountains news and photos by becoming a fan of the William Britten Photography Facebook Page.

Pioneer barn © William Britten use with permission only
John Messer Barn © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mountain Hiking Club cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mountain Hiking Club cabin © William Britten use with permission only
The Life of Wood

The Life of Wood

Smoky Mountain Cabin detail

There are many old pioneer cabins in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Most of them were constructed from native wood, shaped with hand tools such as the broad ax, froe, adz, and drawknife.

The wood in these buildings seems unique and different, with a life of its own. Or perhaps it is the life of the pioneers that remains within the wood. The example above is a classic dove-tail joint used to stack the log walls and keep them tight. The cabin is one you can see in the Cades Cove area of the Park.

The two images below are from cabins at the Mountain Farm Museum near the Cherokee entrance to the Smokies. Notice the nifty crude hinges made from  horse-shoes on the barn door in the lower right image.

Smoky Mountain log barn detailSmoky Mountain log cabin detail

The final two pictures below are from the Smoky Mountain Hiking Club cabin on the Porters Creek Trail in the Greenbrier Section of the Park. The first image shows another example of a dovetail joint.

Smoky Mountain log cabib dovetail joint

Smoky Mountain log cabib detail

Cades Cove: Elijah Oliver Homestead

Cades Cove: Elijah Oliver Homestead

Elijah Oliver Cabin
Elijah Oliver Cabin © William Britten photos use with permission only

All of the Smoky Mtns photos on this page are of the Elijah Oliver cabin. Elijah was John Oliver’s son, and he was born in Cades Cove in 1824. After a time away from the Smoky Mountains, he returned to Cades Cove after the Civil War. Notice the “strangers room” enclosed on the front porch. Smoky Mountains hospitality was so well known that hunters and fishermen travelled, knowing that the mountaineers would give them lodging at no charge.

This homestead is one of the stops along the Cades Cove Loop Road in the Smoky Mountains. Park your car and take the short hike to the cabin and outbuildings–it is very much worth the time and effort to see this fine example of an Early American log cabin and barn.

A Homestead Barn © William Britten use with permission only
A Homestead Barn © William Britten use with permission only

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of my Smoky Mtns photos at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. I’m located in Morning Mist Village, along the historic Arts and Crafts loop on Glades Rd.

Smoky Mtns photos © William Britten use with permission only
Smoky Mtns photos © William Britten use with permission only
Cades Cove: Henry Whitehead Cabin

Cades Cove: Henry Whitehead Cabin

Henry Whitehead cabin in Cades Cove
Henry Whitehead cabin in Cades Cove © William Britten use with permission only

Matilda “Aunt Tildy” Shields married Henry Whitehead after her first husband ran off. Henry built the house pictured above in the Chestnut Flats area of Cades Cove in 1895. Notice the brick chimney! This structure might be called the ultimate log cabin, or sometime called a “transition house” due to its near-perfect construction from logs sawed straight and flat at a nearby mill. Soon the mill-sawed lumber would replace log cabins with frame construction.

Look more closely, and you will see that behind the grand transition cabin sits a much more crude and smaller cabin of logs with a stone rubble chimney. Matilda’s brothers quickly built this cabin when her husband deserted her, and before Henry Whitehead courted and married her, and built her Smoky Mountains dream home.

Henry Whitehead Cabin © William Britten use with permission only
Henry Whitehead Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

Matilda’s son from her first marriage, Josiah “Joe Banty” Gregory, became a prominent producer of moonshine in Cades Cove during Prohibition.

Please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. I’m located in Morning Mist Village, along the historic Arts and Crafts loop on Glades Rd.

Featured Photo: Noah “Bud” Ogle Cabin

Autumn at the Ogle Cabin

Noah “Bud” Ogle was a Smoky Mountain farmer who lived from 1863 to 1913. The cabin was built in the 1880’s and consists of two cabins sharing a single chimney, known as a “saddlebag” style. The Ogle farm is the first stop on the Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail.   From stoplight number 8 in Gatlinburg, head up to the top of the hill and bear left onto Cherokee Orchard Rd, entering the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Ogle place will be just up the road on the right and before the road enters it’s one-way loop for the Motor Nature Trail. There is also a very nice short hike available along the Ogle Nature Trail, which begins just off the back porch!

The three Smoky Mountains photos on this page show the cabin in two seasons. The morning in October in the photo above when I set up my tripod between the cabin and barn, the autumn leaves were at the height of their color, and an early rain shower put a sparkle on the whole scene. The shots below are taken from almost the same location after a winter snow. In these images the browns and whites of the winter scene blend perfectly with the weathered logs of Bud’s cabin.

All of the Bud Ogle Cabin images are available in sizes up to 16×24, in both matted prints and framed. Details of sizes and pricing can be found on the How to Buy page.

Smoky Mountains photos in Winter
Smoky Mountains photos in Winter © William Britten use with permission only
Bud Ogle place in Winter
Bud Ogle place in Winter © William Britten use with permission only

When you visit the Smokies, please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photos at the William Britten Gallery along the historic Arts and Crafts Trail on Glades Rd. in Gatlinburg, TN.

Miles Away on Monday: Summer Evenings

Miles Away on Monday: Summer Evenings

Cabin Evenings © William Britten use with permission only

The day is drawing to a close, time to grab a chair on the porch and relax, watch the evening sky descend over the Smoky Mountains. Listen to the crickets, maybe a whippoorwill, or an owl if it’s getting late. A good time for quiet conversation, reflection on what’s important in your life.

If time allows, please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountains Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN. I’m out on Glades Road along the Arts and Crafts Trail.

Miles Away on Monday: Cabin Dreams

Miles Away on Monday: Cabin Dreams

Dreaming of a Smoky Mountains Cabin © William Britten use with permission only

Ah, Smoky Mountains Dreamin’ … you wake up and feel like you’re in a Thomas Kinkade painting. Soft morning light, the cabins around you still shaking off the night, a little fantasy village. The Smoky Mountains off on the horizon, greeting the day in their own proud way, beckoning you.

This is one of the attractions that draws people to the Smokies over and over.  To enter this world, miles away, something that touches a place deep inside their heart. Almost something that can’t be said, can only be felt.

Really, this is what I try for in a photograph … something that can be felt but not spoken.  William  Britten Gallery in the Morning Mist Village on Glades Rd in Gatlinburg.

I also do resort cabin photography for a select number of rental agencies and owners.

White Christmas in Gatlinburg!

White Christmas in Gatlinburg!

White Christmas 2010 © William Britten use with permission only
White Christmas 2010 © William Britten use with permission only

The folks who rented this cabin Christmas Eve got their money’s worth!  It’s been snowing ever since … all through Christmas Day, and now still some light snow on the 26th. About 8 inches on the ground now. Of course the wonderful view of the Smoky Mountains and Mt. LeConte from this cabin has vanished into the white.  The travelers were checking out this morning, and I hope they made it down the hill and into Gatlinburg.

Tomorrow the sky will clear, and the Smokies will be sparkling with new snow, but today is another day to snuggle inside!

White Christmas in Gatlinburg © William Britten use with permission only
White Christmas in Gatlinburg © William Britten use with permission only
Miles Away on Monday: Last Gasp of the Autumn Leaves

Miles Away on Monday: Last Gasp of the Autumn Leaves

View of Mt. LeConte © William Britten use with permission only
View of Mt. LeConte © William Britten use with permission only

The Smoky Mountain autumn was a good one this year. At lower elevations some pockets of leaves are hanging on, but as you can see in the photo above, the forest is bare on Mt. LeConte.

For some, this is a favorite time to get away to the Smokies. The October crowds are gone, but the days still hold a warmth and a glow. The days tend to drift by in blue-sky splendor this time of year. All the way to Thanksgiving before winter stakes its claim.

If you’re in the area, please stop in and visit me to see the complete display of Smoky Mountain Photography at the William Britten Gallery in Gatlinburg, TN.

Time and place … and memories

I’ve always been fascinated with the concepts of time and place. For example,  the Smoky Mountains have been unchanging for centuries, but in my photography gallery here in Gatlinburg, I can’t tell you how many stories I’ve heard about families returning to the Smokies every year for decades! Families have grown through many generations while they returned to their favorite vacation spot.

Here’s a photo of a resort cabin that I took a couple of years ago:

This cabin was newly constructed, awaiting all of the tourists who would enjoy a vacation in the cabin, and hopefully take home pleasant memories. There are hundreds of modern cabins like this near the Smokies.

And inside the Park boundaries are the cabins of Elkmont, the old resort area that was displaced when the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was opened in the 1930s.

Cabin owners were given lifetime leases, but those are now completed. For a while the Park was going to demolish the old cabins, but the plan now is to keep at least some as a historical area.

You can almost  hear the echoes of the vacationers enjoying their time in this place.

And going even further back in time is Bud Ogle’s cabin–a sturdy pioneer settlers abode, now a stop along the Roaring Fork Motor Trail in the park.

Finally, our tour of Smoky Mountain cabins and memories wouldn’t be complete without this surreal cabin interior of Alfred Reagan’s place. Apparently Alfred chose his paint colors from Sears like this vibrant blue.

Bill

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